New Report: Top Content Marketing Growing Pains for B2B Enterprise Marketers

Every organization experiences growing pains when it comes to growing their content marketing program. Customer needs quickly evolve which means that brands need to be agile enough to meet consumer demand.

The group that maybe has it toughest of all is B2B enterprise marketers. The added complexities of supplying content for multiple business units and product sets, geographical locations and therefore, multiple customer groups is no easy undertaking.

While many B2B enterprise marketers have managed to crack the code for successful content marketing, others are still struggling to manage expectations with reality. The new 2017 B2B Enterprise Content Marketing report from Content Marketing Institute, MarketingProfs and Knowledge Vision helps to uncover some of the top opportunities that exist for B2B enterprise marketers.

Below, I’ve pulled out four of the top opportunities uncovered by the report as well as some helpful tips for overcoming these common hurdles.

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Only 2% of B2B enterprise marketers surveyed would describe their content marketing maturity as sophisticated. Eek! One of the biggest opportunities that seems to exist with this group is the ability to integrate content across the organization.

QuickTip: The complexities of organizational structure at enterprise brands should not to be taken lightly. While there may be completely separate business units that exist, it’s important to find a way for department heads to collaborate on some level. Even just knowing what another team is working on or has seen success with can help guide the content strategy for the other departments.

#2 – Content Results Aren’t Improving Significantly Year-Over-Year

One of the biggest factors to the success of anything is life is your commitment. So it comes as no surprise that 40% of B2B enterprise marketers would rate the success of their content about the same as the previous year when, 35% of these same marketers would rate themselves as only somewhat committed to content marketing.  

QuickTip: All of the data points to the fact that content marketing is an essential part of today’s digital marketing landscape. In order to make content marketing a priority, it’s imperative that leadership is on-board with content initiatives.

#3 – A Documented Content Strategy is a Marketing Must-Have

According to the results, only 38% of B2B enterprise marketers have a documented content marketing strategy. That means over 50% of marketers surveyed do not have a strategy to guide their efforts.

QuickTip: Knowing where to begin developing a content strategy can be a daunting task but here are a couple steps to get you started:

  • Document any goals (especially revenue goals) that your marketing department is responsible for.
  • Create a brief synopsis of what has (and hasn’t) worked in the past to help guide your approach.
  • Since it’s impossible to identify all steps right away, select some key areas of focus for the year to help keep your team on track.

#4 – Content Marketing Budgets Are Low

On average, only 22% of total marketing budgets (not including staff) are spent on content marketing. And a whopping 38% are unsure of the total percentage spent on content efforts. It’s unclear as to where exactly the rest of these funds are allocated, but there is an opportunity to put more behind content marketing.

QuickTip: Whether it means implementing new tools to increase effectiveness or working with a content marketing agency, an investment in content is an investment in your customers. Content has the ability to impact every stage of the buying cycle and is a much cheaper alternative to pumping all of your funds in paid tactics. Additionally, content builds authority and credibility over time while other tactics abruptly stop adding value once they’re turned off.

Download the Full Report for Even More Insights

In the full report, you’ll gain additional insights into what is and isn’t working for B2B enterprise content marketers. The future for marketers isn’t bleak, but there is clearly an opportunity to mature, document and invest in content marketing.

If you’d like to see all of the results, download the 2017 B2B Enterprise Content Marketing report.


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WeeTect Announced to Offer Thermoformable Anti-fog Anti-scratch Goggle Lenses

WeeTect Announced to Offer Thermoformable Anti-fog Anti-scratch Goggle Lenses

WeeTect today announced its new thermoformable anti-fog anti-scratch goggle lenses.

Online PR News – 12-April-2017 – WeeTect, the leading manufacturer and supplier of goggle lenses, today announced its new thermoformable anti-fog anti-scratch goggle lenses. These are injection molded or cut to size lenses available in both standard and custom designs.

Our success in this industry is attributed to WeeTects relentless pursuit for safety by investing in R&D besides strict quality (QC) measures, said Mr. Taylors Lei, the WeeTect Product Manager. With our new thermoformed anti-fog anti-scratch goggle lenses, youll be guaranteed of unmatched comfort, strength and durability.

Features of WeeTects Thermoformable Anti-fog Anti-scratch Goggle Lenses

Superior anti-fog coating

WeeTect goggle lenses are coated with a fog resistant layer that conforms to the EN168, 30 seconds quality test. This coating is a hydrophilic ingredient that is applied to the inner surface of the goggle lens.

High quality anti-scratch performance

This is a thermoformable scratch resistant coating that offers unmatched flexibility in goggle lens design. With this, WeeTect can manufacture goggle lenses of any curvature.

The lenses are available in different shapes and designs for any type of goggle frame.

The WeeTects anti-scratch coating is available in different grades depending on the type of goggle lens. These include >1h (for general use), >3(upgraded version) and 8~9H (superior).

Other technologies

WeeTect has also adopted other goggle lens technologies to improve performance, while meeting the dynamic demand for unique accessories. Among the technologies that are currently available include: Photochromic, polarization, mirrored coating, tinting and revo colors.

All quality tests are done in the WeeTect testing laboratory in Foshan.

The main applications of WeeTect thermoformable anti-fog anti-scratch technologies are available in motocross goggles, racing goggles, prescription goggles, anti-fog swimming goggles, snowboard goggle, dirt bike goggles, etc.

Availability

Goggle lenses with thermoformable anti-fog anti-scratch are available on the companys official websites; both Spanish and English.

There are over 40 standard designs available that vary in thickness and sizes. The customized goggle lens options are also available.

About WeeTect

WeeTect Material Limited manufacturers lens & visors for OEM businesses. Since 1993, the company has invested in R&D, producing a range polycarbonate coating solution.

It has a line of products such as: visors, photochromic lenses, face shields, welding helmets, mirrors and anti-fog solutions; with the most recent being thermoformable anti-fog anti-scratch goggle lenses.

For more information on this product:
Please visit: http://www.weetect.com/goggle-lens/
sales@weetect.com

Company Contact Information
Sunny Sun
http://www.weetect.com
+8615250414925
 

Don’t Kill Your Audience’s Vibe with These Content Marketing Turn-Offs

As of 2017, the overwhelming majority (89%) of B2B marketers use content marketing in some form.

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As you can imagine, how well marketers execute their campaigns varies quite a bit.

Or, as The Content Marketing Institute would put it, there are differences in “content marketing maturity levels.”

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As you can see, a fairly small number (28%) would be considered either mature or sophisticated.

The rest could definitely use some improvement, and there’s a lot of room for growth for many content marketers.

One thing I’ve noticed (especially when it comes to those new to the game) is that many brands engage in tactics that could be considered turn-offs.

This doesn’t necessarily mean being unethical or using black-hat techniques.

It means unknowingly using tactics that annoy site visitors and slowly but surely drive a wedge between the company and its audience.

At best, this results in diminished engagement, a lower follower count, etc.

At worst, it can lead to dwindling traffic numbers, fewer leads, decreased sales, and diluted brand equity.

The bottom line is you don’t want to kill your audience’s vibe with content marketing turn-offs.

Here are some common mistakes I see marketers make and how to avoid them.

Fatiguing your audience

The amount of content on the Internet is mind-boggling.

According to Marketing Profs, roughly two million blog posts are written every single day.

If you really want to get a sense of how much content is being created, check out Every Second on the Internet. It’ll really put this phenomenon into perspective.

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Here’s the thing.

Everyone is trying to outdo one another to claim their piece of the pie and get traffic.

What’s the result?

Many content marketers are grinding out content.

They have the mindset that if they slap up enough content, the leads will come.

They end up flooding their blogs with mediocre content and their social media followers’ feeds with sub-par updates.

This all results in one thing. Content fatigue.

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They fatigue their audiences as well as themselves in the process.

Don’t get me wrong. Fresh content is great.

Of course, you want to post new content consistently.

But I know I feel overwhelmed when someone I follow is constantly blasting me with new content just for the sake of having new content.

I don’t have the time to consume it all.

What I suggest is to chill out with the frequency of your content creation.

Don’t worry so much about constantly populating your blog and social media with new content.

Instead, focus on creating fewer but higher quality pieces.

Try to find the sweet spot between updating your content regularly and giving your audience time to catch their breath.

The sweet spot will differ depending on the nature of your brand and the platform you’re using. Finding it requires a certain level of experimentation on your end.

I also suggest checking out this post from Buffer for advice on this topic. It will give you a better idea of how much you should be posting and how much is too much.

Being too content-centric

I love this graphic that illustrates the difference between being content-centric and audience-centric:

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The difference between the two is to whom your content caters: yourself or your audience.

Here’s an example.

Let’s say your brand is passionate about obscure industry trends, so you frequently write about these topics.

That’s all well and good, but if those topics don’t resonate with your audience, you’re unlikely to gain any real traction.

It’s a fairly widespread issue, considering that creating more engaging content is a top priority for 73% of content creators.

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Over time, being too content-centric will minimize the impact of your campaign.

It hinders engagement, lowers readership, and gradually drives your audience away.

Make sure you’re on the audience-centric side of the spectrum— not the content-centric.

How do you accomplish this?

Two words: qualitative research.

If you’re unfamiliar with this term, let’s start with a definition:

Qualitative research is designed to reveal a target audience’s range of behavior and the perceptions that drive it with reference to specific topics or issues. It uses in-depth studies of small groups of people to guide and support the construction of hypotheses.

Rather than merely observing what’s happening, qualitative research seeks to understand why it’s happening.

This type of research enables you to put yourself in your audience’s shoes and be highly informed when creating your content.

I’m not going to launch into a long-winded discussion of every facet of qualitative research, but let me offer a few key strategies:

  • Ask your blog readers what topics they would like you to cover.
  • Use analytics to identify content trends. See which posts are getting more traffic and engagement.
  • See which keywords your visitors are searching before landing on your blog.
  • Pay close attention to readers’ comments. Look for direct feedback. Note the number of comments on a post—it’s usually indicative of interest level.
  • Check your social media analytics. See what types of content are getting the biggest response.

I also recommend checking out two specific posts on this topic:

Go Beyond Analytics to Give Customers the Content They Crave from The Content Marketing Institute.

Find Out What Your Audience Wants Using Qualitative Research from Positionly.

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Does your content consist of a steady stream of douchey buzzwords and complicated industry jargon only a handful of individuals will actually understand?

If so, this is guaranteed to turn off your audience.

Don’t get me wrong.

You want to come across as being intelligent, knowledgeable, and generally knowing your stuff.

But I feel there’s a fine line between being smart and being pretentious.

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It can be an issue especially for certain industries such as medical, legal, and finance, where complex subjects are routinely discussed.

If you’re not careful, you can easily launch into some needlessly complicated rant and lose the majority of your audience.

It makes you appear insincere, alienates your audience, and makes it much more difficult to get your point across.

To be totally honest, I have been guilty of it myself at certain times.

However, it’s something I seriously strive to avoid these days.

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First, try to stick with a natural, conversational tone when it comes to your content.

I try to approach it as if I’m sitting down with someone face-to-face and having a conversation.

That seems to work for me.

Also, don’t try to jam-pack your content with big words just for the sake of using big words.

Always look for the most direct way to say something without using needless buzzwords and industry jargon.

I also recommend asking yourself the following questions when proofreading your content:

  • Will my average reader understand what I’m saying?
  • Am I writing in my own—unique—voice?
  • Can I simplify what I’ve written?
  • Did I use any overly annoying buzzwords?
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Ever feel like a sleazy used car salesman when creating content?

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It’s not a good path to be on.

In fact, this is perhaps the number one way to turn off would-be readers and lose the readers you’ve currently got.

No one wants to be bombarded with “Buy Now!” messages when they’re trying to kick back and read some content.

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It’s distracting and detracts from the overall user experience.

Here’s the thing about content marketing.

It’s one of the more long-term inbound strategies.

It doesn’t typically involve going for an instant sale.

Content marketing is about building relationships, creating rapport with your audience, and establishing trust over time.

The mentality is that if you take the time to create awesome content that’s genuinely useful, you’ll be primed to make a larger volume of sales down the road.

Therefore, it’s important to have the right mindset when approaching your content.

Here are a few techniques that I recommend:

  • Avoid using interstitials on your website. Google actually started penalizing certain sites that use them.
  • Place your focus on educating rather than selling. Believe me. If you educate your audience and solve a problem for them, the sales will follow.
  • Don’t plug your business or include a CTA until the end of your content.
  • Work on building rapport and establishing trust before asking your audience to buy anything.
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Content marketing has been proven to be less costly and get more leads than outbound marketing.

It also tends to yield higher conversion rates.

But using the wrong tactics and not understanding what your audience does and doesn’t want can marginalize the impact of your campaign.

You don’t want to kill their vibe unwittingly and create a rift between your brand and your audience.

But steering clear of the issues I mentioned above should prevent any missteps on your end and lead to deeper relationships and a more receptive audience.

What’s your number one content marketing turn-off?

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3 Email List Building Techniques You Need To Use in 2017

3 Email List Building Techniques You Need To Use in 2017This is a guest contribution from Jawad Khan.

If you’re serious about blogging, I’m sure you’re already building an email list (or planning to do so)

Since you’re a Problogger reader, I’m also assuming your knowledge and expertise in blogging is significantly higher than most newbies.

So you’re well-aware that “Get Free Email Updates”, that beautiful sign up form in your blog’s side-bar, isn’t an attractive incentive for potential subscribers anymore, right?

No one wants to subscribe to another email list just to pile up more junk in their email inbox.

Don’t get me wrong.

Email is still the best way to build a relationship with your audience and turn them into paying clients.

Studies suggest that 66% of online consumers in the US aged over 15 made a purchase as a direct result of marketing emails.

Source: Quicksprout

Another study suggests that 54% of online buyers that abandon a shopping cart, but are reminded again via email, will complete the purchase. According to a recently published report by email Monday, email marketing has an ROI of 3800% ($38 in return for every $1 spent)

Email marketing isn’t going anywhere. In fact, it has become more important for bloggers, marketers and eCommerce businesses.

But since everyone’s trying to squeeze email addresses out of their blog visitors, people have become more guarded about their contact information and only sahre it away when they see clear value in return.

This is why most marketers use lead magnets for list building.

But it’s 2017, so you need to be a bit more creative and find new ways to effectively deliver your lead magnet to your audience and persuade them to join your list.

Not sure how to do it?

Let me share 3 list building techniques that you’ll see many smart marketers use in the coming months.

1. Host a Virtual Summit to Steal Subscribers from Industry Influencers

You’ve read expert round-up posts, right?

Turn them into video content and you have yourself a high quality virtual summit.

Virtual summits have been around for a while but the concept really picked up in late 2015. Throughout the last year, I’ve seen hundreds of influencers in dozens of different industries participate in virtual summits, skyrocket their email lists and fill their pockets to the top.

It’s one of the fastest ways to not only build an email list but also to enhance your brand image and influence in your niche.

You might have seen banners like this one in your Facebook newsfeed in the last few months.

Here’s how it works

  • The summit host picks a very specific topic for the summit (e.g email list building or Amazon self-publishing, Shopify dropshipping etc.)
  • He decides the dates and the duration of the summit (usually 4-5 days)
  • The host gathers 15-20 experts on the topic and conducts video interviews (live or recorded) with each one of them
  • Every expert who is interviewed has the option to promote a paid offer or a lead magnet during or after the interview (a link to the offer is also published on the interview page)
  • All the experts promote the event to their own email subscribers. For example if a virtual summit has 10 experts with 1000 subscribers each, it is promoted to 10,000 people. This creates a pool of potential subscribers for all the participants.
  • The host gets all the subscribers that opt-in to watch the event live.
  • Once the live event is over, the host can sell the recorded event as a paid product or a lead magnet.

Sounds simple, right?

Hosting a high-quality virtual summit can be expensive and technically challenging.

Which is why only the top influencers in most industries are currently using it for email list building.

But no one’s stopping the lesser known bloggers from doing it.

If you can’t get A-list experts to join your event, look for the second-tier experts who have a loyal following but are looking to expand their reach. You’ll find them in every industry.

If you don’t have a lot of money to spend, use free tools like Google Hangouts to record your interviews, use any WordPress landing page plugin to create landing pages for the event and get the job done.

In short, if you get it right, a virtual summit can literally give you thousands of subscribers overnight.

2. Use Facebook Live Videos To Build Your List in No Time

Facebook Live has spread like wildfire

Studies show that Facebook is getting more than 8 billion video views every day and users are spending 3x more time watching live videos as compared to the recorded ones.

Source: Facebook Video Statistics 2016

The top influencers and experts in almost every industry are using Facebook Live to get closer to their audience, engage with them more frequently, and strengthen their personal brand by answering the most burning questions of their followers.

Darren himself does regular “Ask Me Anything” sessions using Facebook Live.

As I said, the user-engagement level on Facebook Live is much greater than recorded content. And it’s always easier to persuade an engaged audience to take action. Which is why Facebook Live presents the prefect opportunity to route viewers to your email list.

How to do it?

Just ask them.

Really, that’s all it takes.

Create a free resource like an eBook or checklist, which is relevant to the topic of your live video, place it on a landing page to collect emails, and ask users to download it during your Facebook Live session.

Also add the landing page link as a pinned comment on your video, and to the video description so that viewers can download it even when you’re not live.

Amy Porterfield used this exact strategy to get hundreds of subscribers to her email list.

Facebook Live videos currently enjoy additional organic reach, so this is the best time to use it to build your email list.

3. Include Laser-Focused Content Upgrades in Your Guest Posts To Open Floodgates of Subscribers

Guest blogging is one of my favorite ways to drive traffic and find subscribers.

In the last 3 years, I’ve written over 500 guest posts on some of the most widely followed marketing and SEO blogs on the web, generating thousands of email subscribers.

But many bloggers struggle to generate any traction from their guest posts.

Do you know why?

Because they rely on the good old author bio links to send them subscribers. Many others simply link to their homepage and hope people would subscribe to their list.

That’s not how it works.

Bloggers that generate hundreds of subscribers from every guest post do 2 things really well.

  • They write super quality guest posts with lots of actionable insights
  • They create laser-focused content upgrades used within the body content. Most editors have no problem allowing this as long as the post offers real value to the readers.

Not sure what a content upgrade is?

It’s a post specific lead magnet that offers something additional to the readers of a blog post.

Brian Dean (Backlinko) increased his sign up rate by 785% by adding a content upgrade to this post.

Insane!

Bryan Harris shared this detailed case study of how one blogger generated thousands of email signups to his blog by combining content upgrades with guest blogging

They work in all niches.

For example, if you’ve written a blog post “7 Healthy and Safe Weight-Loss Tips for First Time Moms” you could create a checklist on “23 Healthy Foods You Should Eat While Losing Weight” and use it as a content upgrade.

Content upgrades work so well because, unlike generic lead magnets, they are targeted towards an engaged reader who is already interested in the topic.

They’re so effective for lead generation that many leading email marketing tools now have separate features to create content upgrades and add them to your blog posts.

SumoMe, for example, introduced a new two-step pop-up for content upgrades that has been tested to increase signups by 200-300% in some cases.

But when you’re guest blogging, you don’t have access to the tools used by the host blog. So you should simply link to the landing page of your content upgrade from where users can opt-in and subscribe to your list.

Wrapping Up

Email list building is more important for bloggers than ever before. It is the only channel that gives you direct and uninterrupted access to your reader’s inbox, and allows you to focus on long-term relationship building.

The tips I’ve shared in this post are already being used by some of the best marketers on the web. Making them a part of your list building strategy will surely help you attract more relevant and engaged subscribers.

What list building techniques are you applying to your blog right now?

I’d love to hear from you in the comments.

Jawad Khan is a content marketing consultant and a freelance blogger for hire. Follow him on his blog Writing My Destiny, Twitter, and Google+.

The post 3 Email List Building Techniques You Need To Use in 2017 appeared first on ProBlogger.

      

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Content Planning for the Win: 10 Expert Tips to Keep Your Audience Engaged Again & Again

Blank space: Great when it’s a Taylor Swift song (or a nifty 20’s-style cover of same), not awesome when it’s on your editorial calendar. You want to publish with a steady cadence to keep your audience satisfied. But you know that filler won’t do—it’s got to be quality and quantity.

Great content is no accident. It requires careful planning to provide the value and variety your audience craves. At TopRank Marketing, we create content for dozens of clients. That’s a lot of blank space to fill. But when it’s over, we know the high was worth the pain (sorry, now I have Taylor Swift stuck in my head for the rest of the day. Hopefully you do, too).

Here’s how to create a content plan that’s designed to excel.

#1: Start with Goals

“There is no content strategy without measurement strategy. Before embarking on a content initiative, irrespective of medium or platform, it’s important to know what you want to achieve.” Rebecca Lieb, Principal, Conglomotron LLC

The goal of content marketing is to compel your audience to take action. Without the action, you’re missing the “marketing” half of the equation. So don’t start with what you want your audience to know. Start with what you want them to do.

The desired action could be signing up for your blog, downloading a gated asset, attending a webinar, scheduling a demo, or just sharing your content on social media. Whatever you decide, make sure each piece of content is connected to a measurable result.

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“The reason we struggle with content marketing is because we haven’t started with ‘Why?’ Customers don’t care about your vanity metrics. Ask them, ‘How can I help?’” Kristina Halvorson, CEO and Founder, Brain Traffic

At TopRank Marketing we have a name for the type of content that gets results: Best Answer Content. The word key word is “answer,” as in “a response to a question.” You’re not starting a conversation about your brand, you’re continuing a conversation about what concerns your audience.

Listen to the questions your audience is asking through search engine queries, emails to your sales department, forums like Quora, and tools like BuzzSumo and Bloomberry.

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“Your top of the funnel content must be intellectually divorced from your product but emotionally wed to it.” Joe Chernov, VP of Marketing, InsightSquared

Lower-funnel content is designed to lead directly to revenue. So it’s the type of content upper management likes—meaning it’s the type that helps justify your budget. It makes sense that marketers tend to focus on the lower funnel and go light on the upper stages.

The problem with that approach is that most of your traffic and interest is in earlier stages. If you don’t fill the top of the funnel you won’t have anyone left to read your awesome lower-funnel content. It’s important to find a content balance, with a variety of content across all stages of the funnel. The quantity of content in each stage should look like a funnel, too. Think lots of content in the upper stages, less (but more in-depth) content at the bottom.

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“Just as anyone would quickly tire of eating from the same food group day after day, your customers and prospects can grow tired of the same type of content again and again.” Jason Miller, Global Content & Social Marketing Leader, LinkedIn Marketing EMEA

I don’t envy the folks at Buzzfeed. They came up with a winning content formula and now they’re stuck with it. Pity the writer who has to come up with yet another “28 Hilarious Things Dogs Did This Passover (You Won’t Believe #24)!” As the world has moved on from clickbait-y listicles, the site has struggled to reinvent itself.

Keep your content fresh, and fill holes in your editorial calendar, by changing up the content type. Save room for those easy-to-write, sharable listicles, sure. But balance them with thought leadership pieces that firmly establish your brand’s point of view. Add how-to articles that are 100% utility. You can even round up useful content from other sources and curate for your audience.

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“I use a Thanksgiving analogy…You cook up this giant bird to serve up on one glorious occasion and then proceed to slice and dice this thing for weeks on end. If you are like most families you are going to be repurposing this bird as leftovers for quite some time, creating everything from sandwiches, to soups, and more. Your content marketing strategy can be thought of in the same way.” Rebecca Lieb

At LinkedIn Marketing Solutions*, they have a lovely mixed metaphor to describe their content strategy. It starts with a “Big Rock,” a hefty piece of gated content that includes visuals, influencer interviews, and in-depth discussion on a single topic (like their Sophisticated Marketer’s series).

They use the Big Rock to create “turkey slices,” blog posts that repurpose a small part of the content. Turkey slices help fill in your editorial calendar, and each one can serve to promote the Big Rock. A big enough Big Rock can keep your blog supplied with turkey slices for six months or more. Just don’t ask why the rocks are made of turkey.

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“For those of you who think comedy won’t work for your brand, ask yourself: Will it work for your customers?” Tim Washer, Creative Director, Cisco

When you have plenty of thought leadership and useful, practical content, it’s okay to let loose every once in a while. Generally, people like to be entertained and like to laugh. Even decision makers at Fortune 500 companies have been known to appreciate the occasional chuckle. So there’s no excuse for not experimenting with a little comedy, as long as you stay consistent with your brand voice.

Ease into the idea of humorous content with an April Fool’s Day post—it’s the one day even the most staid of institutions can crack wise. If you get a good response, try a funny, light post once a month or so. Still not convinced humor would work for your industry? Look, if financial services marketers can enjoy a silly post, your audience likely will, too.

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“By its very nature, interactive content engages participants in an activity: answering questions, making choices, exploring scenarios. It’s a great way to capture attention right from the start. Individuals have to think and respond; they can’t just snooze through it.” Scott Brinker, ion interactive Co-Founder & CTO

I’m starting to get really excited at the potential of interactive content. It takes less than an hour to make a quiz that looks professionally designed, can be embedded on your blog, and provides detailed analytics on the back end. You can create a poll or a survey even more quickly.

Your chief competitor for your audience’s attention is not other content—it’s everything else in the world. We’re asking people to stop whatever else they were doing, ignore every other source of distraction, and engage. Interactive content makes it far easier to earn that level of attention.

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“If you want to cultivate regular contributors to your content, create an editorial committee and invite key producers to join. Staffers will feel a greater sense of ownership and engagement in the content marketing program. They’ll also feel greater responsibility to produce quality content on time.” Michael Tevlin, Freelance Copywriter & Story Expert

“Authenticity” and “transparency” are marketing buzzwords that have almost, but not quite, lost their meaning through repetition. But there’s a reason we keep talking about these two concepts: Consumers want to hear the authentic voices of the people behind your brand. They know the purest expression of your brand’s values comes from your brand’s employees.

Cultivate these voices by asking internal experts across the organization to contribute to your content. As with external influencers (more about them in a moment), start with a small request. For example, if you’re writing a how-to guide, ask someone in a relevant department to contribute a quote or two. Next time, ask for a full interview.

Before you know it, you’ll have a team of regular contributors, filling your calendar with diverse voices across your organization.

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“The future is not about marketing to influencers; it’s about marketing with them. Treating influencers as an extension of your company, rather than a distribution channel, will result in a more impactful experience for influencers and consumers alike.” Emily Garvey, Group Account Director, SVP

At TopRank Marketing, we have our own unique take on influencer marketing. It’s not about paying Snapchat stars thousands of dollars to pose with a product. Rather, it’s about building relationships with people who are genuinely influential to a relevant audience, and aligned with your brand’s goals and values.

You can start building relationships without even making contact with an influencer. For example, you can create a post that includes already-published quotes from influencers. Like, say, this post. Let your influencers know that you featured their expertise. Then nurture the relationship by helping to promote their content. Eventually, you can start co-creating content with the influencer, building in their contributions from the ground up. As with internal experts, start with an interview and go from there.

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“Twenty-five percent of search results for the world’s top 20 largest brands are links to user generated content and thirty-four percent of bloggers post opinions about products and brands.” Erik Qualman, Keynote Speaker & CEO, Equalman

Still stuck with a few blank spaces in your calendar? Let your audience fill them in for you. User-generated content helps foster community, builds enthusiasm for your offering, lets customers see real-world examples of what your company can do, and a host of other benefits.

The best way to encourage user-generated content is, simply, to ask for it. Ask for reviews, product photos, customer stories. Run a contest and recognize the best submissions.

Even better, ask your most valued clients if you can feature them—they will very likely jump at the chance. You get a compelling testimonial, they get extra visibility.

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A blank content calendar can be daunting. But don’t fill it in with random acts of content. Start with your goals in mind, then match them with the topics your audience most wants to hear about. Plan for a good variety of content types and formats to keep things fresh, and make sure to fill the top of your funnel as well as engage the lower part.

And if you need help creating great content that inspires action, don’t hesitate to contact us. We’ve got a long list of satisfied customers. But we’ve got a blank space…and we’ll write your name.


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5 Steps to Creating a Productive Blogging To Do List

I have always been a to do list writer, but I haven’t always used a to do list productively. See if any of the following sound familiar, you:

  • Write things on your to do list after you have done them, just so you can cross them off.
  • Add so much on your to do list that it overwhelms you and you don’t look at it.
  • Scan your to do list looking for the easiest things to do.
  • Get to the end of the day and you have done quite a few tasks from the to do list, but not the activities that will help you achieve your goal.
  • Email yourself notes and use your inbox as a to do list.

None of the above are productive ways to use a to do list, but it is possible to use a to do list to make you more productive. You just need to put thought into it and ideally have a defined process behind the approach you take.

I have evolved my to do list process over the years and for the last two years have found a process that not only allows me to get stuff done, but it makes sure I get the right stuff done. To be productive we need to do more than get more work done. We need to get the right things done.

It is worth noting that you will never get everything done that you want to do. We have so many ideas for things that we want to do and no matter how productive we are, we simply will not be able to do all of them unless of course we hire ourselves a team of VAs and that is a whole other blog post!

Being productive doesn’t mean doing it all, it means choosing wisely where to spend your time, energy and attention to help you achieve your goals. An effective to do list will help you work productively.

1. Create a weekly master list

Ideas floating around in our head can distract us from our task at hand. We often keep thinking of things because we don’t want to forget them. Thinking about a new idea for a product you could create while your writing your latest blog post however, will see your attention split and as a consequence the blog post takes longer to write.

Allocate a time once a week where you create a master weekly to do list. Sunday afternoon afternoons work well for me. I find that after sometime off work over the weekend, I have lots of ideas to get out of my head. Using a simple A4 size notebook I write two columns – the first is for blogging and the second is for family and household tasks.

I write the two lists at the same time as I find once I start writing things to do, they all come to my mind and I just separate them out in columns on the page. It is a great feeling to have everything out of your head and on to paper.

2. Write down your goal

On another page I will create my to do list for Monday. I will write the day and date, then write my blogging goal for the year at the top of the page. Writing down your goal regularly reminds you of what the goal is and writing it before you choose what tasks you are going to do for the day helps increase your focus on what is most important over the longer term.

Your to do list might contain these activities:

  • Create a video tutorial
  • Write newsletter
  • Update resource page with affiliate links
  • Catch up on emails
  • Write module one of course

To help prioritise them you would look at your stated goal for the year. If you have chosen your goal well for the year, your goal acts as a decision making filter for you. For example, if your goal was to increase revenue by creating your own products then your first task should be to write module one of the course. If you goal however was to build your newsletter list, then writing your newsletter should be your first task.

3. Write down your key project

To achieve your goal for the year, there will most likely be a number of projects you will need to complete.  If we follow on from the example above and your goal was to increase revenue by creating your own products, you current project might be creating an online course. You would write that as your project at the top of your to do list and make sure that you spend some time on your project every work day.

4. List three tasks for your day

With your goal for the year and current project at the top of your page, you would then turn to your master list and choose three tasks that will help you achieve your goal and project. Limiting the tasks you put on the list prevents you from choosing a range of easy tasks. It is much easier to sit down and clear out your inbox, respond to comments and spend time on social media than it is to write the first module for your online course.

By limiting your tasks to three, you have the room to choose tasks that will add value to your blogging bottom line.

5. Visualise your day

Many of you may have read the point above and are now shaking your head thinking visualising my day sounds all woo woo. I used to think this too until I tried it. It truly makes a difference. Having written my to list the night before, when I head to the gym first thing in the morning, I can better visualise my day.

I visualise what I am going to do when I get home from the gym to get things organised at home for the day. This allows me to get straight into my work when I get back from taking the kids to school. I then visualise which will be the first task I will work on for the day, I visualise the break I will take once I have finished my first work session, then repeat the process by visualising the next task I will work on.

Visualisation works because it reinforces your priorities and they are front of mind. So when I sit in front of my computer and I am tempted to head to my inbox, there is a disconnect experienced – this doesn’t match up to my visualisation and I am much more likely to resist the temptation and start work on my project.

Charles Duhigg a Pulitzer-prize winning reporter for The New York Times, writes about the importance of visualisation in his book Smarter Faster Better: The Secrets of Being Productive in Life and Business.

“Your brain has to decide what deserves attention and what deserves to be ignored, and [the] way it does it is compare what we expect is going to happen to what’s actually going on,” Duhigg told Quartz. {source}

Then it is a matter of rinse and repeat. Through out the week as you think of things you need to do, you add them to your master list. At the end of each work day you write your to do list for the next day, with your goal and project at the top of the page.

As the week ends, you create your new master list and you are once again setting yourself up for a productive week via your to do list.

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What’s Next for Twitter? Social Domination or Eminent Failure?

Despite recent improvements to user experience and platform flexibility, the struggle to retain and attract new users—and grow revenue—is still real for Twitter. And, unfortunately, these may be the least of the platform’s worries these days.

From widespread trolling and harassment to simply having a confusing interface, Twitter is drawing criticism for nearly every aspect of its operation. In addition, after shutting down Vine and cutting more than 300 jobs last fall, more fuel was added to the claims that Twitter was getting closer to death.

So … Is Twitter Dying?

As an eternal optimist, I’m not ready to say Twitter’s fate is doomed. As WIRED’s Davey Alba said earlier this year, while Twitter may be a bit of a mess—it still has some real potential and value to offer.

“The thing is, in spite of its mess, there’s still a lot to value in Twitter,” Alba wrote. “No other social network has built up quite the same kind of cultural currency—and for good reason. Unlike other networks, Twitter’s influence is decentralized; it lies in its power users, the ones who use it to give voice to people and movements that may not have risen otherwise. Just look at how Twitter both took and pushed the pulse of the 2016 elections. Or how crises unfold on the platform. Or how social movements take hold.”

But I’m also a realist, so I have to acknowledge that Twitter has some serious work to do to remain viable and competitive. Currently, Twitter reports around 313 million monthly active users, but Statista had that number around 319 million at the end of 2016 and is now reporting 317 million as of January 2017. However, Snapchat, Instagram and Facebook come in with 301 million, 600 million and 1.86 billion monthly active users, respectively.

Cheating Death

You’re probably thinking, how can Twitter avoid falling off a cliff? How can it quell discontent? How can it retain and attract new users? How does it breathe new life into its platform and business?

Well, I certainly don’t have all the answers here. I’m not an expert in business operations or product development—nor am I a clairvoyant with a crystal ball. However, as a confident marketer, I definitely see a couple opportunities.

Twitter is experiencing many of the same problems that other brands face in today’s digital world—increasing competition for audience attention, bad press and reviews, stagnant growth, and so on. Below are two opportunities I think Twitter, and any struggling brand, could take advantage.

#1 – Double-down on your core strengths.

For more than a decade, social media platforms have been looking for ways to set themselves apart from one another—something Twitter made clear right out of the gate. But as social media becomes increasingly ingrained in people’s daily lives, we’re now in a time where social platforms are balancing uniqueness with offering all the things. (Look no further than Facebook and Instagram’s new Snapchat-like features, or the rise of hashtags and mentioning capabilities across platforms.)

For Twitter to stay relevant, it’ll most certainly have to evolve its platform in some way to mimic the things that are working for the competition. But it shouldn’t lose sight of what sets it apart—nor its core strengths. And its core strength is the real-time format that allows users to be intimately engaged with what’s happening in the world and in their social circle.

The big takeaway for all: Define your core strengths, and use them to propel your business strategy and marketing efforts forward.

#2 – Embrace criticism—and address it in public.

Every company dreams of 100% customer or user satisfaction, but that’s rarely the case—even for the most successful and revered brands out there. And, these days, social media is often an easy place for people to air their grievances—an irony Twitter itself is intimately familiar with.

Generally speaking, Twitter is taking a pretty standard PR approach to addressing its shortcomings and user gripes, but it may not hurt to be a little more transparent about it all. Honesty and humility can go a long way.

The big takeaway for all: Use any negative feedback as an opportunity to show humility, understanding and your commitment to taking care of your users, customers and glaring issues.

Will Twitter Die or Find New Life?

As I said, I’m no psychic. But it appears that Twitter is making strides to address some nagging issues.

Last week, Twitter announced that usernames no longer count toward the 140-character limit in tweet replies—which allows users more room to say what they need to say, but still keeps its essence intact. In addition, in early February Twitter announced safety updates to address abusive accounts and content.

“We stand for freedom of expression and people being able to see all sides of any topic,” Twitter said in a release. “That’s put in jeopardy when abuse and harassment stifle and silence those voices. We won’t tolerate it and we’re launching new efforts to stop it.”

Twitter also retired its default profile image of an egg. The new default image is a human silhouette, which Recode said aims to encourage more people to upload pictures of themselves, and also move the brand away from an image that’s often associated with trolls.

Finally, news just broke there’s a campaign to turn Twitter into a user-owned cooperative. According to Business Insider, Twitter shareholders will vote on whether to investigate the proposal at its May 22 meeting. While Twitter is opposed to the plan, and it seems unlikely to move forward, it can’t be dismissed.

“It’s an interesting proposal—and underlines the discontent some shareholders feel with the ailing social network, which is struggling to grow or turn a profit,” the Business Insider article said.

The bottom line? Twitter is trying, but mostly treading water, and what its leaders do in the next year will likely determine whether the platform rises again or meets defeat.

What’s your take on Twitter’s future? Tell us in the comments section below.


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What’s Next for Twitter? Social Domination or Eminent Failure? | http://www.toprankblog.com

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Live from MarketingSherpa Summit 2017: When is a click more important than a purchase?

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How long do you have to know someone before helping them move? I don’t know about you, but I wouldn’t invest that kind of time without having an existing relationship with a person. As I listened to my father, Flint McGlaughlin teach in today’s Email Messaging Workshop at MarketingSherpa Summit 2017, I recalled an episode of Seinfeld in which Jerry went into panic when asked to help a new friend move:

seinfeld

If you wouldn’t even help someone move in the beginning of a friendship, how could you expect a customer to be ready to make a purchase with only an email? Marketers often get so focused on increasing purchases that we confuse the goal of an email with that of a landing page. The goal of most emails is simply to get a click.

In today’s workshop, we reviewed a recent experiment conducted with an internationally recognized news service known, specifically, for its work in journalism. The goal of this test was to increase paid home delivery subscriptions using promotional email campaigns.

control (email course live blog)The Control

The Control email attempted to sell the customer, asking too much at this stage in the conversion process. Everything from the headline to the CTA asked the customer to “subscribe” before they even know what they’re being asked to subscribe to. Essentially, the value was not understood, and therefore, the perceived cost outweighed the perceived value. As Flint McGlaughlin, writes in his book:

“The marketer must match the message to the stage. We achieve this by synchronizing geography with chronology. This requires the marketer to map each micro-yes of the thought sequence, to understand each degree of incremental commitment, and most importantly, to view each macro-yes as the sum of the total micro-yes(s) in the process.”The Marketer as Philosopher, “Reflection 5.”

 

The Treatmenttreatment (email workshop live blog)

After analyzing the customer’s motivation and mapping the thought sequence, the research team developed a treatment that guided the reader through a logical series of micro-conversions. The new email ended with a call-to-action that asked for just the right amount of commitment to match the customer’s stage in the conversion process.

The Results

This resulted in a 30% increase in clicksthroughs, and thus, a 136% increase in purchases.

Ultimately, your value proposition should be the essence of every email; the copy is only the form. As Dr. McGlaughlin often says, “Clarity trumps persuasion.” With everyone’s inboxes already flooded with emails, it is natural to have to compete with the many other voices in the marketplace; however, you should never have to compete with unnecessary voices in your own collateral. When writing effective email copy, you must always consider the question, “Is there a single word/piece of content in the email that does not help to achieve a click?” Anything unnecessary is just “noise” distracting from the click.

Today, the importance of communicating your message quickly and efficiently is more pressing than ever. The amount of time you have to hook your readers is growing smaller and smaller every day. People receive their email notifications on an anything from a laptop, to a smart phone, or even more limited, a smart watch.

smart watch (email workshop live blog)I recently purchased a smart watch, myself, and have been greatly enjoying my new ability to judge every notification I get within seconds of its delivery. I can glance at the subject and first sentence or two of an email and know immediately whether I am interested in its content. With so many of your customers having this same ability, you must ensure that your email captures their interest immediately. At the end of the day, to stand out from the many competing voices and limitations in the marketplace, there are essentially six key objectives your email should accomplish:

  1. Arrest attention
  2. Build connection
  3. Build problem
  4. Build interest
  5. Build suspense
  6. Transfer momentum

Summit Day 1 starts tomorrow, so the speaker sessions officially begin — I’ll be eagerly looking forward to learning more about how to craft effective messaging in them.

Click Here For Original Source Of The Article

When is a Click More Important than a Purchase?

How long do you have to know someone before helping them move? I don’t know about you, but I wouldn’t invest that kind of time without having an existing relationship with a person. As I listened to my father, Flint McGlaughlin teach in today’s Email Messaging Workshop at MarketingSherpa Summit 2017, I recalled an episode of Seinfeld in which Jerry went into panic when asked to help a new friend move:

 

If you wouldn’t even help someone move in the beginning of a friendship, how could you expect a customer to be ready to make a purchase with only an email? Marketers often get so focused on increasing purchases that we confuse the goal of an email with that of a landing page. The goal of most emails is simply to get a click.

In today’s workshop, we reviewed a recent experiment conducted with an internationally recognized news service known, specifically, for its work in journalism. The goal of this test was to increase paid home delivery subscriptions using promotional email campaigns.

The Control

The Control email attempted to sell the customer, asking too much at this stage in the conversion process. Everything from the headline to the CTA asked the customer to “subscribe” before they even know what they’re being asked to subscribe to. Essentially, the value was not understood, and therefore, the perceived cost outweighed the perceived value. As Flint McGlaughlin, writes in his book:

“The marketer must match the message to the stage. We achieve this by synchronizing geography with chronology. This requires the marketer to map each micro-yes of the thought sequence, to understand each degree of incremental commitment, and most importantly, to view each macro-yes as the sum of the total micro-yes(s) in the process.”The Marketer as Philosopher, “Reflection 5.”

 

The Treatment

After analyzing the customer’s motivation and mapping the thought sequence, the research team developed a treatment that guided the reader through a logical series of micro-conversions. The new email ended with a call-to-action that asked for just the right amount of commitment to match the customer’s stage in the conversion process.

The Results

This resulted in a 30% increase in clicksthroughs, and thus, a 136% increase in purchases.

Ultimately, your value proposition should be the essence of every email; the copy is only the form. As Dr. McGlaughlin often says, “Clarity trumps persuasion.” With everyone’s inboxes already flooded with emails, it is natural to have to compete with the many other voices in the marketplace; however, you should never have to compete with unnecessary voices in your own collateral. When writing effective email copy, you must always consider the question, “Is there a single word/piece of content in the email that does not help to achieve a click?” Anything unnecessary is just “noise” distracting from the click.

Today, the importance of communicating your message quickly and efficiently is more pressing than ever. The amount of time you have to hook your readers is growing smaller and smaller every day. People receive their email notifications on an anything from a laptop, to a smart phone, or even more limited, a smart watch.

I recently purchased a smart watch, myself, and have been greatly enjoying my new ability to judge every notification I get within seconds of its delivery. I can glance at the subject and first sentence or two of an email and know immediately whether I am interested in its content. With so many of your customers having this same ability, you must ensure that your email captures their interest immediately. At the end of the day, to stand out from the many competing voices and limitations in the marketplace, there are essentially six key objectives your email should accomplish:

  1. Arrest attention
  2. Build connection
  3. Build problem
  4. Build interest
  5. Build suspense
  6. Transfer momentum

Summit Day 1 starts tomorrow, so the speaker sessions officially begin — I’ll be eagerly looking forward to learning more about how to craft effective messaging in them.

Click Here For Original Source Of The Article

If You Give Away Your Best Content, Your Business Will Grow by 290%

If you give it away—offer it free—they will come.

This should perhaps be the quote to encompass the business model of freeconomics.

It’s a model that involves giving away your best content.

Believe it or not, more and more companies are integrating and seeing amazing results with freeconomics today.

At first thought, it may seem ludicrous.

I mean, how can you expect to turn a profit if you’re getting no direct return on your content?

You’re spending loads of time and exerting a ton of energy to earn a big fat $0.00.

It just doesn’t make sense.

But when you look at the big picture, giving away your best content—offering it free—makes total sense.

It’s a catalyst for business growth, and I’ve even had clients who’ve grown their businesses by as much as 290% by going this route.

Allow me to explain.

How content impacts a buyer’s decision

Seldom do today’s consumers whip out their credit cards and blindly make a purchase.

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No, most perform a considerable amount of research beforehand.

Besides researching the product itself, many consumers want to know more about the company behind the product.

They want to be sure that the company is legit, knows its stuff, and is trustworthy.

But how do they learn more about a company?

Besides simply reading the About page on the company’s website, consumers look at content.

In fact, Demand Gen Report found

47% of buyers viewed three to five pieces of content before engaging with a sales rep.

The report also discovered that

51% of B2B buyers rely more on content to research and make B2B purchasing decisions than they did a year ago.

This means that content has become an integral part of the buying process, and it’s now a trend that’s likely to continue growing.

By making your best content easily accessible to your audience, you can pull more leads into your sales funnel, which should eventually increase sales.

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This is a question posed by Vertical Response in an article discussing the benefits of giving away content.

By gate, they mean putting an obstacle in front of content (e.g., filling out a form to get it).

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In this article, they point out two specific instances when not gating your content is a smart business decision.

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Internationally acclaimed marketing and sales strategist David Meerman Scott says that according to his statistics,

a white paper or eBook will be downloaded 20 times and up to 50 times more without a gate in front of it.

And why wouldn’t it?

By removing the gate and making content accessible to everyone free, you’ll naturally generate more downloads.

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Joe Pulizzi is the founder of the Content Marketing Institute and one of the most respected names in content marketing.

Here’s a quote from Joe regarding gated and non-gated content:

Let’s say you received 1,000 leads via your white paper download. From David’s numbers, let’s even take a more conservative 10x more downloads if we remove the gate.

This would give us 10,000 downloads with no lead data. Of all those people, let’s say that 1 percent would share this with their audiences (with a VERY conservative audience of 100 people, although most blogs get much more).

With those numbers, the total possible content reach for gated content would be 2,000 people. Non-gated content would be 20,000 people.

When you break it down, you see that gating the content would result in 2,000 people viewing the content, and not gating it would result in 20,000.

By simply giving it away, you’re theoretically getting ten times the leads.

Just think of the impact on your sales figures!

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Here’s the thing with freeconomics and giving away your content.

There’s no immediate payoff.

It’s intrinsically a long-term strategy that involves making sales and growing your business over the long run.

It’s about building rapport and trust now so that you can make sales at a later date.

You could liken it to growing a crop:

image02

When you plant a seed, you don’t expect to harvest the next day.

It takes time. But when you consider the bounty, it’s well worth it.

I realize this can be an issue for some people, considering the instant gratification culture we live in: we want results, and we want them now.

And I get it. It’s not easy spending an immense amount of time and energy working on something that will not give you visible results for six months or even a year.

But when you follow the right formula, the payoff is huge and makes way more sense than gating your content.

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Long ago, I realized the power that content marketing can yield.

That’s why I’ve made valuable content the cornerstone of my marketing.

More specifically, I’ve made it a point to give away the bulk of my content.

For instance, on Quick Sprout, I offer a sizable library of free content with Quick Sprout University:

image06

This is where my audience can find in-depth information on everything from SEO and link building to reputation management and conversion optimization.

It also provides content for all knowledge levels (e.g., beginner, intermediate, and advanced).

On NeilPatel.com, I have a free podcast called Marketing School, where listeners can learn everything they need to know about online marketing:

image04

Of course, I maintain blogs on these sites as well.

And you know what? It has completely paid off.

Although I didn’t get massive results right off the bat, giving away content has gotten me an insane number of sales.

Without it, I doubt I would be where I’m at today.

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I’m sure many of you are familiar with Gary Vaynerchuk.

image00

He’s an incredibly successful entrepreneur, author, speaker, and a major influencer.

He also swears like a sailor and makes no apologies for it.

Gary basically built an empire from scratch largely by giving away loads of quality content (e.g., YouTube videos, blog posts, infographics, etc.).

He even wrote a post called, Why You Shouldn’t Charge for Your Best Work.

Here’s a screenshot of his opening intro that captures his reasoning behind giving away content:

image01

In other words, this tactic allows you to create real trust and boost your brand equity so that prospects feel comfortable doing business with you.

Even though you’re not earning any money initially, you’re investing in the long-term success of your company.

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Just so you’re aware of the impact that this tactic can have, I’d like to point out a handful of specific benefits:

  • It’s one of the best ways to nurture leads. According to Marketing Sherpa, “73% of all B2B leads are not sales ready.”
  • You can position your brand as an authority. “45% of a brand’s image can be attributed to what it says and how it says it.”
  • It enables you to tell your brand’s story and convey your philosophy and values.
  • It reduces skepticism. “In 1997, consumers indicated that they had a high level of confidence in 52% of brands. By 2008 that percentage dropped to 22%.” This is a great way to slash through any doubts your prospects may have.
  • It’s an excellent way to educate consumers on your product’s features and the way it differs from the products of competitors.
  • You can address any objections that may arise.
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Let’s say you’re on board with the concept of freeconomics and you understand the logic behind giving your best content for free.

This brings us to one important question.

What type of content should you create? Do certain types of content influence buying decisions more than others?

To answer these questions, I’d like to point out some additional statistics from Demand Gen Report.

Take a look at the type of content used in the past 12 months to make B2B purchasing decisions:

  • White papers – 82%
  • Webinars – 78%
  • Case studies – 73%
  • E-books – 67%
  • Blog posts – 66%
  • Infographics – 66%
  • Third-party/analyst reports – 62%
  • Video/motion graphics – 47%
  • Interactive presentations – 36%

This doesn’t necessarily mean this is the order in which your company should prioritize its content, but it should serve as a general guideline.

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Although the concept of freeconomics and giving away your best content may go against conventional business wisdom, there’s no denying the impact this approach can have.

The results are convincing.

I can speak from personal experience and say this is absolutely one of the best ways to grow your business. It’s done wonders for me.

But in order to make this strategy work for you, it requires a long-term commitment.

You need to treat it as an endurance race—not a sprint.

If you stay the course with your content marketing, you can grow your business by as much as 290%.

What type of free content has resonated the most with your audience?

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